Meet Avery Ashmun! Avery works as a color specialist/stylist/assistant manager at Bishop’s Cut and Color in Lowry. The Lowry Bishop’s is one of my favorite allied-owned, queer-operated establishments. The owner and staff are dedicated to respect and style. Check him out and see for yourself. Mention GayDenver and get a complimentary hair wash and scalp massage! To schedule, an appointment check out the website or call 303-557-0232.

 

Q: Where are you from? How long have you been in Denver?

A: I’m from SouthWest Florida. I came out to Colorado for my boyfriend. We’ve been dating for 2 years but a lot of it was long distance. For a year and a half, I was flying out here once a month. Eventually, I just decided to join him!

 

Q: How long have you been cutting hair? How long have you been with Bishop’s?

 A: I’ve been cutting hair for 11 years. In Florida, I had my studio for 7 years. It was a one-man show but that gave me a great experience. I’ve been with Bishop’s for 7 months. I love Bishop’s! I was worried about working for someone else after doing my own thing for so long, but it worked out wonderfully. I liked the vibe and the atmosphere was authentic. I just felt comfortable with the staff and the clients.

 

Q: What do you like about the profession?

A: Well it’s always great making people feel better about themselves, right? Getting to talk about the strengths of people’s aesthetics all day is cool. I love watching clients evolve and transform themselves as their life goes on. Bringing out what they feel to how they look is the greatest feeling.

 

Q: What’s one of your favorite transformation stories?

 A: I remember this girl came into my shop a few years ago She had just lost over a hundred pounds. She wanted to do something special for herself. I changed up her color and got her a trendier cut that brought out her new sense of confidence. Just being a part of someone’s story in such a positive way, is amazing.

 

Q: What did you want to be when you were younger? What would you like to be doing 10 years from now?

A: A drug rehabilitation counselor. Well, there were quite a few things that I wanted to be but I went to college for that kind of counseling. Life took me on a different journey and I love it. I would love to also groom dogs in the future!

 

Q: What’s your coming-out story?

 A: I came out twice! I came out in my junior year of high school. After I graduated, I tried to make my family happy. I became super religious and went back into the closet. That went on until I turned about 26ish I came out officially again! It was big deal both times but especially the second. My family is incredibly conservative and religious (Jehova’s Witnesses). It came down to standing my ground and setting new boundaries. That was the hardest part, sticking true to what I knew I wanted.

 

Q: Is there a new style/trend that you like?

A: I like the wolf cut. It’s a modern version of shag or mullet. I texture the hair heavily and disconnect parts of it. There’s a lot of variety within it, and it doesn’t take a ton of time to get ready.

 

Q: What would you say your specialty is?

A: I love colors, especially biolage highlights and blonding service. I’m a texture specialist as well and I love the textures you can get with a razor.

 

Q: Who inspired your sense of style?

A:  Well more often than not, I’m personally making choices based on comfort. But professionally I’m inspired by a few people. Guy Tang is a well-known stylist that comes to mind. Tabitha Coffee as well, not because of her techniques, but because I respect her take-charge attitude and how she holds people accountable. She was on Sheer Genuis

 

Q: What’s the worst hairstyle you gave someone?

A: There’s this one lady that comes to mind. This was in Florida and this older lady wanted a permed mullet. So a perm on the top and straight in the back. She loved it! I was a little embarrassed by it, but I wasn’t wearing it! I just made sure to fully communicate with her what we were doing and it worked out.

 

Q: What are hairstylist stereotypes you like to avoid?

A: That we are only going to do what we like. While I do give suggestions based on their features and lifestyle, I try and listen to what the client is trying to walk away with. I ask my clients many questions but most importantly I listen to what they say.

 

Jeff Wilson
Author: Jeff Wilson

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